Winning projects 2017-2018

Provincial Reading Recognition Awards

Lire à deux, c’est mieux!
(Reading buddies)
Commission scolaire de Montréal
École Saint-Étienne
Kathy Lang, Nathalie Julien and Sandra Verilli

At École primaire Saint-Étienne, teachers have set up a mentoring system for preschool and Cycle Three students to help the little ones integrate when they start school and to give them an appetite for reading. These pairings allow the older children to introduce the younger ones to effective reading strategies and show them how these strategies can be used.

When they visited the municipal library, the older children noticed that the younger ones loved books about animals. The children took information from these books to create a group book. The older children guided the younger ones through the various steps, from research to word processing and producing the illustrations. Later on, paintings featuring the animals in the group book were created and exhibited. The paintings, inspired by the works of Québec illustrators, were used to illustrate short stories written by teams, each comprising one preschooler and one Cycle Three student.

Quand les mots sortent des livres et prennent vie autour de moi
(When the words jump off the page and come to life)
Commission scolaire de Saint-Hyacinthe
Écoles Sainte-Rosalie, Sacré-Cœur, Saint-Damase, aux Quatre-Vents and Douville
Chantal Dubé, Myriam Houle, Caroline Gendron, Mijanou Beaumier, Sophia Aubin, Pierrette Proulx, Claudine Sauvageau and Dominic Anctil

Five teachers from five schools at the Commission scolaire de Saint-Hyacinthe were intent on motivating their students to read and helping them learn to read and write. With the help of Professor Dominic Anctil from Université de Montréal and their education consultant, they created an interactive reading project designed to increase students’ vocabulary and develop their inference skills. Periods spent reading a variety of texts were followed by games and activities to help students reach these two objectives. Some of the activities included retelling the story, using photos to represent keywords, and memorizing words and using them in different contexts. Teachers quickly noticed the positive effects of the project: students made better causal inferences, remembered and used new words, and paid more attention and showed greater interest during reading periods.

Petite-Patrie, je t’aime
(I love you, La Petite-Patrie)
Commission scolaire de Montréal
École La Mennais
Line Bellerose, Lucie Béchard, Véronique D’Anjou and Hélène Fortin

Montréal’s 375th birthday celebrations inspired Cycle Three teachers at École La Mennais to have their students learn all about their city, specifically their neighbourhood, La Petite-Patrie. The project involved having the students write and illustrate texts to show how they see La Petite-Patrie. The individual works were integrated into a collective montage in the form of a free-standing structure representing the neighbourhood. After first being put on display in the school library, the structure will be moved to the Bibliothèque Marc-Favreau for the summer. In order to carry out the project, the students visited exhibits about Montréal, before immersing themselves in a vast array of books about the city. They also explored the neighbourhood to meet the people, admire the architecture and learn about its history. The discoveries the students made during these very different activities helped them create works that show different facets of La Petite-Patrie.

Le monument du jour
(Monument of the day)
Commission scolaire du Lac-Saint-Jean
Centre de formation professionnelle Alma
Manon Lepage and Isabelle Villeneuve

At the Centre de formation professionnelle Alma, a teacher uses texts about architecture to pique her students’ curiosity and enrich their cultural knowledge. At the start of each day, a student gives a presentation about a monument on the World Heritage List, providing the rest of the class with information about the history and special features of each monument, as well as the building techniques used. The teacher gets the other students involved by commenting on, or asking questions about, the presentation to make sure they understand it. The students enjoy reading about new places and learning about architectural language, despite the complex nature of some of the reading material.

Amitié
(Friendship)
Commission scolaire des Draveurs
École Le Petit Prince
Nathalie Barbe, Nancy Laframboise and Manon Boulet

This project, entitled “Amitié” (Friendship), was carried out in a classroom of 9-to-12-year-old children with dysphasia. It used books on the themes of friendship and acceptance to help students develop their social skills. Severe difficulties with receptive and expressive language can impede communication for these students and make it difficult for them to maintain harmonious relationships with others. During guided reading, students were asked to identify any gestures of friendship the characters make, then acted them out in different situations. These improvisations were recreated as comic strips. Text was added to pictures, and the resulting comic strips were compiled in an e-book format. The e-book was presented to children in preschool and Elementary Cycle One. This project helped the students to work on their language skills, use the potential of ICTs, and transfer what they learned in developing their social skills. Furthermore, bonds were forged, and the students enjoyed working together on the project.

Lecture contextualisée d’albums jeunesse au primaire
(Reading picture books aloud)
Commission scolaire Marie-Victorin
École Gérard-Filion
Mélissa Pilote and Charlène Ouellette

At École secondaire Gérard-Filion, a teacher in a welcoming class organized live readings to improve students’ language fluency and pronunciation. These activities involved visiting the municipal library to select picture books about diversity or immigration, and reading aloud to preschoolers and students in Elementary Cycle One. In order to prepare for the activity, the students participated in weekly workshops on phonological awareness. They learned strategies for overcoming any obstacles during the practice sessions. They also recorded their readings for better feedback. After practising with native French speakers, the students were ready to read to an audience. The project was a success: participants improved their reading competencies, were motivated to read, became curious about children’s literature and had an opportunity to use ICTs. These readings fostered contact between students in regular classes and welcoming classes, and raised awareness about differences and cultural diversity.

Pedagogical prize

Mini-colloque sur le partage de pratiques gagnantes en lecture
(Small symposium on sharing best practices in reading)
Centre Frédéric
Commission scolaire des Chênes
Michelle Moreau, Amélie Beaudoin and Lyne Bellerive

When education consultants from the Commission scolaire des Chênes wanted to promote best reading practices in the classroom, they organized a small symposium for 100 or so elementary teachers who were invited to share their experiences with reading in the classroom. Various practices were presented, such as interactive reading, reading workshops, reader’s notebook, reading conference, guided reading and book webs. Two workshops looked at search tools and criteria for selecting appropriate children’s books. The education consultants guided the workshop leaders in planning their presentations and consolidated the introduction into the classroom of the practices being presented. Not only did participants find the experience rewarding, the symposium also helped set up effective reading practices and improve the use of books in the classroom. Of course, the students were the first to benefit from the new practices, having more fun with reading and better understanding the books they read.

Association québécoise des utilisateurs d’outils technologiques à des fins pédagogiques et sociales (AQUOPS) Prize

Brownies le lutin
(An elf named Brownie)
Commission scolaire des Sommets
École Hamelin
Ludovick St-Laurent, Sylvain Lévesque and Alexandra Lombardi

Students in Elementary 5 and 6 at École Hamelin in Wotton undertook a project to create an e book. They started by exploring different genres of books about Christmas. Armed with their discoveries and their inspiration, the students imagined a trip around the world for an elf named Brownie. Teams of two students each wrote a chapter of the story about the character’s travels in 12 countries. The chapters all had the same structure: first, an informative section on the country visited and, second, a narrative in the style of a travelogue. The drawings and layout were produced using software. The project allowed the students to explore different literary genres, write a collective narrative, develop their computer skills and learn about the countries that Brownie visited. The students also used their mathematical skills to carry out another project: financing a trip to Ottawa by selling copies of the e book and 2000 brownies that the students had baked.

Association pour la promotion des services documentaires scolaires (APSDS) Prize

Une collection interculturelle pour soutenir l’intégration linguistique et sociale
(An intercultural collection to support linguistic and social integration)
Commission scolaire des Draveurs
Julie Legault, Marie Hélène Labory, Soreya Dali, Noris Pertuz, Nathalie Lévesque, Michel Enright, Simon Robichaud, Toibibou Ali Mohamed, Didier Lamoureux, Théo Lardanchet and André Savard

There are more and more students from immigrant backgrounds in schools under the Commission scolaire des Draveurs. A team was set up to answer the new needs arising from this situation. After a series of consultations and discussions, the team decided to build a special collection of books to meet the school board’s needs in terms of the students’ linguistic and social integration. Theme-based book packages were put together for the welcoming and francization classes at both the elementary and secondary levels. The collection includes a variety of books that are adapted to the students’ level and rich in information about local culture. Various teaching tools were created to guide teachers in their strategic use of the books.

Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ) Prize

Petite-Patrie, je t’aime
(I love you, La Petite-Patrie)
Commission scolaire de Montréal
École La Mennais
Line Bellerose, Lucie Béchard, Véronique D’Anjou and Hélène Fortin

Montréal’s 375th birthday celebrations inspired Cycle Three teachers at École La Mennais to have their students learn all about their city, specifically their neighbourhood, La Petite-Patrie. The project involved having the students write and illustrate texts to show how they see La Petite-Patrie. The individual works were integrated into a collective montage in the form of a free-standing structure representing the neighbourhood. After first being put on display in the school library, the structure will be moved to the Bibliothèque Marc-Favreau for the summer. In order to carry out the project, the students visited exhibits about Montréal, before immersing themselves in a vast array of books about the city. They also explored the neighbourhood to meet the people, admire the architecture and learn about its history. The discoveries the students made during these very different activities helped them create works that show different facets of La Petite-Patrie.

Illustration Québec (IQ) Prize

Il était une fois… des réseaux littéraires
(Once upon a time… book webs)
Commission scolaire des Chic-Chocs
École Saint-Rosaire
Manon Packwood, Lucie Cloutier and Caroline Boudreau

Every month, Elementary 2 students at École Saint-Rosaire were given a new book web. With participation from the school and municipal librarians, the children explored a number of different works. Various means, including discussion, helped students explore and understand the texts. The book webs led to a variety of writing situations, and to art and theatre projects that were staged and filmed. The video clips were presented on YouTube and on the Radio-Gaspésie website. This project, which encouraged students to work in different subect areas simultaneously and to use ICTs, also introduced them to a number of authors and illustrators, and helped them to improve their reading fluency and develop their interest in books, their self-confidence and their writing skills.

Association québécoise des enseignantes et des enseignants du primaire (AQEP) Prize

Il était une fois… des réseaux littéraires
(Once upon a time… book webs)
Commission scolaire des Chic-Chocs
École Saint-Rosaire
Manon Packwood, Lucie Cloutier and Caroline Boudreau

Every month, Elementary 2 students at École Saint-Rosaire were given a new book web. With participation from the school and municipal librarians, the children explored a number of different works. Various means, including discussion, helped students explore and understand the texts. The book webs led to a variety of writing situations, and to art and theatre projects that were staged and filmed. The video clips were presented on YouTube and on the Radio-Gaspésie website. This project, which encouraged students to work in different subect areas simultaneously and to use ICTs, also introduced them to a number of authors and illustrators, and helped them to improve their reading fluency and develop their interest in books, their self-confidence and their writing skills.

Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois (UNEQ) Prize

Petite-Patrie, je t’aime
(I love you, La Petite-Patrie)
Commission scolaire de Montréal
École La Mennais
Line Bellerose, Lucie Béchard, Véronique D’Anjou and Hélène Fortin

Montréal’s 375th birthday celebrations inspired Cycle Three teachers at École La Mennais to have their students learn all about their city, specifically their neighbourhood, La Petite-Patrie. The project involved having the students write and illustrate texts to show how they see La Petite-Patrie. The individual works were integrated into a collective montage in the form of a free-standing structure representing the neighbourhood. After first being put on display in the school library, the structure will be moved to the Bibliothèque Marc-Favreau for the summer. In order to carry out the project, the students visited exhibits about Montréal, before immersing themselves in a vast array of books about the city. They also explored the neighbourhood to meet the people, admire the architecture and learn about its history. The discoveries the students made during these very different activities helped them create works that show different facets of La Petite-Patrie.

Communication jeunesse (CJ) Prize

Les légendes en jeu
(Game of legends)
English Montréal School Board
Merton School
Rosana Caplan, Audrée Anne Dupont and Debbie Adams

Merton School, an elementary school in Montréal, offers a French immersion program. A teacher at Merton decided to introduce her students to Québec legends by having them create a video game about legends. This project was designed to help students discover and appreciate Québec francophone culture, have them interact in French and give them an opportunity to develop their computer skills. The teacher began by telling the students some legends to spark their interest. The teacher then invited them to read legends in teams of three, and to present these legends to the other students. Using the legends as models, they wrote their own legend about a place in Québec. Lastly, the students used computer software to create a video game based on Québec legends. With this exciting project, the students discovered an aspect of Québec francophone culture and, on another level, the richness of the French language.

Association québécoise des enseignants de français langue seconde (AQEFLS) Prize

Lecture contextualisée d’albums jeunesse au primaire
(Reading picture books to elementary students)
Commission scolaire Marie-Victorin
École Gérard-Filion
Mélissa Pilote and Charlène Ouellette

At École secondaire Gérard-Filion, a teacher in a welcoming class organized live readings to improve students’ language fluency and pronunciation. These activities involved visiting the municipal library to select picture books about diversity or immigration, and reading aloud to preschoolers and students in Elementary Cycle One. In order to prepare for the activity, the students participated in weekly workshops on phonological awareness. They learned strategies for overcoming obstacles during the practice sessions. They also recorded their readings for better feedback. After practising with native French speakers, the students were ready to read to an audience. The project was a success: participants improved their reading competencies, were motivated to read, became curious about children’s literature and had an opportunity to use ICTs. These readings fostered contact between students in regular classes and welcoming classes, and raised awareness about differences and cultural diversity.

Association des bibliothécaires du Québec ‒ Québec Library Association Award (ABQLA) Prize

Amitié
(Friendship)
Commission scolaire des Draveurs
École Le Petit Prince
Nathalie Barbe, Nancy Laframboise and Manon Boulet

This project, entitled “Amitié” (Friendship), was carried out in a classroom of 9-to-12-year-old children with dysphasia. It used books on the themes of friendship and acceptance to help students develop their social skills. Severe difficulties with receptive and expressive language can impede communication for these students and make it difficult for them to maintain harmonious relationships with others. During guided reading, students were asked to identify any gestures of friendship the characters make, then acted them out in different situations. These improvisations were recreated as comic strips. Text was added to pictures, and the resulting comic strips were compiled in an e-book format. The e-book was presented to children in preschool and Elementary Cycle One. This project helped the students to work on their language skills, use the potential of ICTs, and transfer what they learned in developing their social skills. Furthermore, bonds were forged, and the students enjoyed working together on the project.

Association of Teachers of English of Quebec (ATEQ) Prize

Bilingual Book Bags
New Frontiers School Board
Mary Gardner School
Lynn Harkness, Catherine Garand-Butcher and Lolita Fulhrott

Two preschool teachers at a bilingual school in the Montréal area decided to create a project to motivate children to read. The project consisted in preparing bags with both the French and English versions of a book, bilingual instructions and suggestions for fun activities related to the story in the picture book. The students each took turns bringing the bag home for a few days. With the instructions and the books in both languages, unilingual parents were able to read aloud to their children and to guide them through the suggested activities. Furthermore, as the students were familiar with the books and the activities, they were able to tell the story in their own words and to explain to their parents, in both languages, the activities to be carried out. The whole family could participate in this project to help them establish good reading habits at home.

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